Lies

Lies

Lies by T.M. Logan (Suspense)

Lies starts out strong. Joe Lynch suspects his wife is having an affair with Ben, a married friend with whom they socialize as couples. He confronts Ben in a hotel parking lot, they get into a fight, and he knocks Ben unconscious, possibly worse. Meanwhile, his own little boy is having an asthma attack in Joe’s car, and Joe must leave the scene if he’s going to save his son’s life. When he returns, Ben is gone and so is Joe’s phone, which he dropped during the scuffle. Things go downhill from there.

Unfortunately, the strong beginning and initial tension were not sustained. Plenty of unexplained things happen, the plot moves right along, but I still found myself putting the book down, sometimes for days at a time, without any longing to get back to the story. Although I was curious as to what was going on, I was never gripped with a need to keep reading in order to find out. Perhaps it was because I had no sympathy for any of the characters except Joe’s little boy.

If there were clues to what was going on, I missed them. Instead, I felt totally sideswiped by the ending. It seemed contrived to me, highly unlikely. On the other hand, I couldn’t really identify with any of the adults, and so it’s possible that their behaviors in this case were plausible; I just don’t think I know anyone who would go so over the top for the reasons given.

Grandma gives Lies three stars. 3 stars

Bella Reads and Reviews received a free copy from the publisher via NetGalley with a request for an honest review.

 

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The Patriots of Mars: The God That Failed


the-patriots-of-mars

The Patriots of Mars: The God That Failed by Jeff Faria (Science Fiction)

I don’t read a lot of books about sci-fi worlds, and, of course, if you’re reading about life on Mars, this is world-creation stuff. That part of this book was very impressive to me, although daunting at times. Simulated intelligence, bots for everything, aural and optic implants, artificial atmosphere, communication wonders, and an all-knowing technological presence called MOM that keeps everything going and everyone under observation. Lots of technical information about how things work and lots of detail that was mind-boggling but impressive. Lots of creativity and imagination.

The story itself starts with a group of young people trapped in a mine on Mars, and we soon learn that they’re up against some real baddies in terms of transnational corporations that control everything. We don’t get a lot of time to know these characters, however, before the story starts jumping among lots of characters on Earth and in various locations on Mars until, frankly, I was exhausted from trying to keep track of them all. The Homesteaders and the New Australians and others on Mars are doing their best to change the balance of power — hence the “Patriots” reference — while on Earth, the U.S. military is sending a ship full of troops to maintain the status quo. The early group of young people, one of whom gets visions from something called The Guide, become critical members of the resistance who must stop the incoming ship. Meanwhile, the SIMs and bots and MOM seem to be doing their own thing, in a complicated scenario that made me glad I wasn’t there.

The book is fairly long (or at least it felt that way), but it doesn’t really contain that much action, and the characters are flat. I would have been more interested in a book about the Homesteaders and the folks in New Australia who lived outside of the colonies established by the transnats. They seemed to have some personality and depth, but they remained on the periphery in more ways than one.

Grandma gives The Patriots of Mars three stars. 3 stars

Bella Reads and Reviews Books received a free copy from the author in exchange for an honest review.